Projects

The plan ‘de Biezenhof’ is part of the new residential area ‘Waterrijk Woerden’ and is situated along a natural watery region. The urban scheme of ‘Waterrijk Woerden’ was designed by West 8 and refers to the traditional Dutch water cities such as Delft and Leiden. The design is made in collabiation with Klunder architects. Almost every dwelling is individual and has a specific connection to the water.

The plan of Biezenhof is divided in two parts: there is one block of family houses around a courtyard on the edge of the lake, and there is a row of water houses and apartments along a canal.

The buyers of the houses could choose between several types of houses as well as between four architects. Due to the possibilities in combining type and architect, not one house is the same. Every house has a singular character: the lake houses have a beautiful view on the lake, the street houses have a garden, and the canal houses enclose big terraces. In the public space there are a few parking places, the majority of parking places are organised in garages.

The houses designed by Knappers are characteristic because of the huge roof overhanging the façade. This contributes to the shelter-against-the water identity of the houses, and refers to the greenhouse glass constructions in the low lands. At the street side these houses are made of brick, which gives them a closed and open (to the light and the water) individuality.

House Hilde lies on the dunes, on the tourist route between Station Castricum and dunes. The building opened in January 2015 and combines a depot with a museum function. The archaeological center is named Hilde, a woman from the fourth century AD and found in 1995 during an excavation in Castricum.

Hilde house was commissioned by the Province of North-Holland. Every Dutch province is responsible for the preservation and exhibition of archaeological finds within its borders. The old depot of North Holland in Wormer was too small, the climate was bad manageable and it was only limited accessible to visitors. The building on the Zanderij in Castricum offers plenty of space for storage and exhibiting archaeological finds and collections.

Hilde house has a floor area of 4,480 m2 and is divided into a pavilion and an underground depot. The building is designed with the surrounding landscape.  The draft refers to an old dune landscape (so called “nollen” landscape) that is much older than the current shifting sand dunes and can still be found at various places in North-Holland. In the aboveground elongated pavilion on the one side the main entrance, with desk, museum shop, and a space for temporary exhibitions, cloakroom and toilets are situated, on the other side the office staff. On the first floor is a small restaurant with terrace and auditorium. The elongated shape and the 70-meter roof of the building refer to the early medieval farms, as they have been in the area. The curved roof structure is finished with Corten steel sheeting as a reference to thatched farms. The large overhangs of the roof protect the interior from direct sunlight, which allows the use of large glass surfaces. The façade is decorated with stone from Morocco, fossil pintail squid in it, a reference to the archaeological feature of the building. This stone also comes back into the interior.

The depot is about 2,200 m2 and is divided into several archives and the centrally located exhibition space. The hilly “nollen” landscape is, as it were, pulled over the depot. By placing a meter of sand on top of this part of the building a stable climate is achieved in a passive way and only limited installations are necessary in order to maintain a constant temperature and humidity in the depot. By putting strong in design and construction on sustainability House Hilde has an average score of 8.6 on the sustainability label. In addition, the integration of buildings with the landscape certainly has a symbolic value: in the ground is the best place to preserve archaeological treasures.

The new faculty OCP of Delft university of technology, accommodates the disciplines of Mechanical, Maritime and Industrial Design. During the constructionworks school continued. The new building shows a contemporary, logical and efficient architectural structure with it's own recognizable facade in the TU-district. The interior design is executed as an integral part of the whole plan.

On the Boerhaave Campus, part of the Bio Science park in Leiden, the historical anatomy-building has been transformed into housing for Phd-students and researchers of the Leiden University. The new apartments are characterized by their high ceilings and old constructions. A small mezzanine is created to function as a bedroom. Right beside the existing building a new appartmentbuilding is erected, designed by Van Gameren of Mecanoo Architects. The total complex contains 166 apartments and is the first step in the complete transformation of the Boerhaave Campus.

The Plantsoen in Leiden is well known for the historical appearance of both the city park (1836) and the houses of the last quarter of the 19th century. The park was originally landscaped on the edge of the city in the place of an old defense belt. At the entrance of the park at the east side the monumental building Plantsoen 1 – 3 is redeveloped in a complex with 6 apartments. The apartments of about 150 m2 are provided with all luxury and comfort, such as a private indoor garage, spacious roof terraces and an elevator while retaining the historical look and value of the buildings. Redevelopment also applies to sustainability; obtaining Energy label A. Exterior facades, window frames and roof are additionally insulated. The houses are underfloor heated and solar panels are provided on the roof.

The municipal monument at Plantsoen 1 – 3 is divided over three floors and a basement.  The property at number 1 was originally a fully detached house, number 3 was part of a block of 3 houses. Both buildings date from 1875 and were connected in 1957 and converted into one large nursing home. In this function change, the original qualities have largely been lost. The round expansion at number 1 dates from 1993.

In the new layout with 6 apartment, the monuments are restored to their former glory by restoration contractor Burgy from Leiden. The façade of the intermediate building is renewed and aligned with the monuments. The existing façade of the round building is finished with a bronze wall cladding, a ‘veil‘ with a leaf motif. This pattern is inspired by the leaf motifs and decorations of the 19th century, which can still be found in various places along the Plantsoen. The round with ‘veil’ becomes a special recognition point in the inner city.

Each apartment has both rooms in the monumental area as well as in the newer parts. The interior of the monumental buildings is provided with appropriate details to bring back the historical character as much as possible. This specific part is provided by Verlaan & Bouwstra architects from Vianen.

On the inside buyers have a lot of freedom of choice; they can choose for an even richer historical finish with wall tension, panelling and en-suite layout or a tight, modern finish and layout; both are possible. Each apartment is unique, has its own layout and its own character.  Only the view is the same for all apartments; they all look out over the beautiful monumental city park the Plantsoen at the town canal ‘Singel’.

The construction has started in the first quarter of 2017.